Volunteers — 3) Impact

Profile of Marketing Options®

Third of Three Posts:
1) Types
2) A Strategy
3) Impact

If, with persistency and time, the expected volunteerism of the four-step plan does become ingrained into the culture of a club, here’s what a Board can expect.

Type One — One or two Type Ones may feel a sense of responsibility now that the Board has made it clear that all members are expected to volunteer. Some Type Ones simply become apathetic and need to be explicitly reminded that their club must have volunteers, particularly if the club’s activities are extensive. Whatever the case, a few Type Ones may now actually step forward and volunteer thus moving up to Type Two. Continue reading Volunteers — 3) Impact

Volunteers — 2) A Strategy

Profile of Marketing Options®

Second of Three Posts:
1) Types
2) A Strategy
3) Impact

If your club does not have enough volunteer help to meet its needs, your Board of Directors may be to blame. It’s the Board’s job to provide the leadership and policy-making to resolve the problem.

True, a Board generally doesn’t have any power to force members of a club to volunteer. A Board can request, negotiate, cajole and beg for volunteers but usually only an employer or government has any real power to insist. By definition, the word volunteer implies a willingness to freely donate time and work. So what can a Board do for a club that’s not meeting its needs for volunteer help? Continue reading Volunteers — 2) A Strategy

Volunteers — 1) Types

Profile of Marketing Options®

First of Three Posts:
1) Types
2) A Strategy
3) Impact

Based the an average wage in Canada and the number of volunteer hours, volunteerism generates about $50 billion in annual economic value. Not bad for a country with a population less than the state of California and it’s a prime reason clubs survive. Even the richest clubs need volunteers if only for their Boards. For clubs of more modest means, volunteers keep the club running and membership dues reasonable — most need them to exist.

Is volunteerism working in your club? When your President or a committee chair calls for volunteers, do hands go up, signifying a willingness to help, or do heads turn away? Are your Board and Committee positions all filled or are there vacancies for lack of volunteers? Are new club initiatives dropped because help is not available for their successful implementation? Continue reading Volunteers — 1) Types

Harper Stumbles

Profile of Steve Carlson

When the NDP government was elected in Alberta, I sold two of my six oil stocks. Yesterday morning before Stephen Harper’s agreement with the G7 was announced to phase out fossil fuels by 2100, I sold two more. This morning I won’t sell my last two. Reason? One of the companies is not active in Canada, the other is on an acquisition march and might become a take-over target itself.

That’s about all the uncertainty I can tolerate in the oil and gas industry. I don’t want to lose any more sleep over the Prime Minister’s commitment. I’ll leave the sleepless nights to Harper and he will be having them. Why? Because in the coming months his Conservative government will likely lose any hope of forming a majority government in the next election and his party may not even form a minority one. In fact, by the end of the year, they may not have much political clout at all. ‘Eastern treachery’ will cost him dearly in the West, although many Conservative voters in provinces to the east of Ottawa aren’t going to be very happy either. Continue reading Harper Stumbles

By-Laws — Democratically

Profile of Marketing Options®

Non-profit, unincorporated clubs writing new by-laws or revising old ones have to make a decision. How democratic should their by-laws be? Some by-laws leave most of the decision-making process affecting the club’s health and prosperity in the hands of a Board of Directors or an Executive Committee. Others provide a more democratic environment for members with inclusions in their by-laws that allow a Director to do their jobs but at the forbearance of the voting membership.

For example, by-laws can allow members to vote a Director out of office. This one appears in an article entitled ‘Board and Directors’ under a ‘Declaring Vacancies’ Section:

Voting Members may by a two-thirds vote at a General Meeting of Members declare a Director’s position vacant: a) if the Director fails to perform the substantial responsibilities of the position or, b) for other cause.” Continue reading By-Laws — Democratically